**Finally, a cure for the common cold!**

It occurred to me today that in all of the different challenges I've posted on this blog, I don't think I've ever posted one that's strictly improv. So, straight from Team Challenges, here you go!



Set Up

Place all of the materials listed below in a brown paper bag. Read the list of improv materials and the team instructions out loud to the team.

Improv Materials

1 cardboard tube
1 plastic spoon
1 empty tissue box
5 cotton balls
5 drinking straws
1 orange

Team Instructions

A giant pharmaceutical company has finally found a cure for the common cold. The company chose your team to create an ad campaign encouraging consumers to buy this new medication. You have four minutes to create a TV commercial touting the benefits of the medication. Your advertisement should include the name of the new product, the benefits it can provide to sick people and of course, the various and many side effects that may be encountered by those who use it. You will be notified when you have one minute of planning time remaining. When time expires, you will have one minute to present your advertisement to the pharmaceutical company for their approval. You will receive ten bonus points if every team member is involved in the presentation, as well as up to ten points each for creativity, cooperation and communication.

Have fun!


3 comments:

Start Up said...

I am wondering if the time for this activity is realistic. It seems awfully short.

Kris Bordessa said...

The purpose of giving teams a really tight time frame in which to work is to encourage them to work creatively and cooperatively. With such a short time, they MUST be efficient in their communication in order to move from idea to finished product in only a few minutes. This can be done – I’ve watched some pretty impressive solutions come out of only four minutes worth of planning.

Now, that said, in Team Challenges, I point out that every team will differ and that the times are entirely flexible (for that matter, so are the materials!). Teachers and team leaders know what their team is capable of. A team new to this type of challenge might be better off with eight minutes in which to work, and even so, may still feel rushed. But, as they practice with a variety of these types of activities, their ability to effectively come up with a fast solution will improve. This improvement is what I love to see when I work with kids!

ldrunnrmom said...

Kris wrote "Now, that said, in Team Challenges, I point out that every team will differ and that the times are entirely flexible (for that matter, so are the materials!). Teachers and team leaders know what their team is capable of."

I'd like to add that another thing about these challenges is that you can do them over and over again- by changing one or more of the materials, by adding or taking something away (something we do with DI eXtreme and it is a ton of fun, really!) Do ...whatever! Change it up! It is good for the kids to challenge themselves- to do it with a higher score outcome, to be funnier, to be more dramatic, - never solving it the same way, though, no matter whether you change anything about it or not. This puts them on the spot and requires even more creativity as time goes on.

You could even have them challenge their parents to do the challenge and put on a show- or the younger siblings. They LEARN from observing how other people approach the same challenge, too!

Chris